Imogen Patel

I mogen Patel, currently based in London, is a multidisciplinary artist born in Hertfordshire. Her work currently draws on themes related to race and identity, by exploring her placement as a British-Asian woman in a post-colonial Britain. Patel completed her Foundation Diploma at Camberwell College of Arts in 2018, and then went on to complete a BA in Fine Art: Painting at University of Brighton in 2021.

It was during the pandemic and the widespread discussion on racial injustice that Patel began to reflect on experiences that made her stand out or question her identity. This reflection evolved her practice to what it is today and has led to becoming part of the collective ‘We Matter’. What started off as a touring exhibition, has now expanded to a collective that aims to amplify racially marginalised voices across the world.

Patel has exhibited her work at ‘VOLT’ in Eastbourne as part of their first Open Call group exhibition. Most recently, Patel has been part of ‘Otherlandz’ inaugural exhibition, where she joined a group of female artists with diverse cultural backgrounds to exhibit work that addresses themes surrounding identity and belonging.

“The relationship I have with race is difficult. My practice explores my representation within both the White British and Indian communities, as I struggle to fully identify with either.

I fuse my heritages via the process of collage. This technique is present in every stage of creation, giving me the ability to alter the placement of both urban and rural landscapes. I use Sari fabrics to acknowledge the symbolic expressions embedded within Indian clothing, but this also serves to represent a part of my identity which I rejected whilst growing up. By exposing these suppressed experiences, I send a powerful message to a younger self.

The emptiness that surrounds the subjects in my paintings evokes feelings of isolation. This sensation mirrors my early experiences of segregation. Although this was a difficult memory to address, it shaped my practice and exposed parts of my identity that I often felt afraid to show. Within the expanses that I construct, I manipulate the representation of my identity, and therefore gain agency and control over how others perceive me”.

/* My practice explores my representation within both the White British and Indian communities, as I struggle to fully identify with either. */