Untitled Bog Oak 3

$10,000.00
Size:
50cm x 44cm x 30cm
Year:
2020
Medium:
Oil
Medium:
Painting

Curator's Eye

Using raw and often industrial polymers, pigments and clays, Lamba creates works which take elements commonly found within a natural landscape and reconstitutes them as entirely new forms yet retaining and displaying the essence or ‘reality’ of the material. The colour, texture and material compositions of the works are not separate entities, their symbiotic relationship is integral to the artist’s attempt to understand them as a whole. 

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Using raw and often industrial polymers, pigments and clays I create works which take elements commonly found within a natural landscape: reconstituting them as entirely new forms yet retaining and displaying the essence or ‘reality’ of the material.

Starting with powdered pigments, porcelain, burnt and foraged materials and binding agents I begin the piece by creating a mixture. Each previous work is recorded into a recipe book which provides the starting point for a new ‘painting’. Over time I have learnt which parameters to adjust in order to effect the crack formations. Using only my hands, I work the clay-like mixture on to a prepared panel, eventually leaving it to set. The reaction is very slow; with cracks developing initially beneath the thickly pigmented surface and gradually spreading across the piece. This reciprocal arrangement between the initial forms and the later developed cracks can be considered the substance of the final work. Although comparisons can be drawn to the natural world, with similar cracks appearing in arid earth during times of drought, it is the creating force of these fissures that is of interest, the cause rather than the effect.

The colour, texture and material compositions of my work are not separate entities, their symbiotic relationship is integral in my attempt to understand them as a whole. An audience might look at my work and be faced with a sense of confusion, which can then be relieved by relating the piece to personal experience. The pieces may also be viewed simply as forms existing within a space, with which one may choose to interact philosophically, or purely as an aesthetic observer.

My wish is that the works are treated not as literal representations, but perhaps in the way that a hiker may view a precarious outcrop, or surfers a wave forcing its way to shore. Something to overcome that may reveal new truths.