Warrior

$5,500.00 - $36,500.00
Year:
2020
Medium:
Photography
Medium:
Edition

Curator's Eye

Global Eye Award 2020 winner Chris Fallows creates dramatic photographs that embody the purest form of beauty – the natural world. An award-winning wildlife photographer concerned with environmental sustainability, Fallows masterfully captures intimate moments with the world’s rarest creatures. As time is paused for a moment within his works, the majesty of his noble protagonists is conveyed with sensitivity and understanding. Furthermore, Fallow’s strict monochromatic colour scheme and expert use of the play between light and shadow, only adds to the heighted drama of the moment captured.

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Contrary to popular belief the life of a male lion is not easy. Although male lions are more often than not seen lying down or commandeering the spoils of their lionesses’ hard work, when their call to action comes, it is usually extremely hostile.

To become King in the lion world is no easy task; it requires tenacity, great strength and courage as well as good strategy and just sheer luck. The luck is down to being born with a few strong male siblings with whom to forge close brotherly bonds. These bonds and coalitions are especially important when defending their territories and prides, as the more firepower you have to take on any challengers, the better your chances are of staying alive and siring more offsPrint. 

This magnificent Kalahari black-maned male lion was in the prime of his life and one of two males who held sway over territory in the Letihau region of the Central Kalahari Game Reserve. This particular area is about as remote a location as any that can still be found in Africa. For hundreds of kilometres it is just you and whatever you cross paths with. 

I encountered the Warrior on one of his routine territorial patrols, where at strategic points he would scent mark bushes, trees and other important features that would be recognised by any challenger as a boundary not to be crossed.

I remember lying flat on the ground as he approached where I lay. I dared not trip the shutter until he was very close as I knew from previous experience how that simple sound could result in an altering of course. And I needed him to come as close as possible. When he was just 20 metres away I took my first image. He cocked his head for a second and then kept coming. A few more paces and I fired again.

This time he stopped, picked up the direction of the sound and the source from which it came, which was me. I lay there with this regal male lion staring at me with curious golden orbs, weighing up his next move to the intruder in his kingdom. After several seconds of watching he started approaching and then when only a few metres away, he slightly altered course, head down and apparently indifferent to my presence.I was neither a threat nor a challenge: merely a curiosity in his line of duty.